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Without a mask, talking (reading a passage of text) gave off about 10 times more particles than simple breathing. Forced coughing produced a variable amount of particles. One of the volunteers in the study was a superemitter who consistently produced nearly 100 times as many particles as the others when coughing.
 
Kurkjian: My favorite trade of the winter meetings occurred on Dec. 4, 1988. The Orioles, the team I covered for The Baltimore Sun, sent star first baseman Eddie Murray to the Dodgers for pitchers Jay Howell and Brian Holton, and shortstop Juan Bell. Murray would be a first-ballot Hall of Famer just from his 12 years in Baltimore. It was an enormous deal for both teams, but it had been kept so secretive until we discovered that Roland Hemond, the GM of the Orioles, and Fred Claire of the Dodgers, had met in a hotel in Chicago shortly before the meetings to discuss the deal. When I called Hemond in his hotel room, he said, "You ask tough questions," and answered none of them. Hemond is an all-time favorite; he did everything honestly, by the book. So when I walked with him on his way to the podium to officially announce the Murray trade, I asked for the third player the Orioles were getting. Hemond said, "Sorry, I can't tell you until the deal is done.'' Ten seconds later, he announced the trade.

Allen certainly has the numbers of a Hall of Famer. During the 11-year peak of his career (1964-74), Allen had an offensive WAR of 68.5, easily the highest of that era (beating out first-ballot Hall of Famers such as Aaron, Frank Robinson and Carl Yastrzemski). Many point to his relatively low career home run total of 351 as a reason he shouldn’t be in the Hall, but he played in an era of unprecedented pitching dominance (culminating in 1968’s famous “Year of the Pitcher,” which saw Denny McLain win 31 games and Bob Gibson have a 1.12 ERA). During his peak years, Allen’s 319 home runs were the fifth-most in the majors, and his 0.940 on-base percentage plus slugging percentage (OPS) was second only to Aaron.

Well, in Orlando a couple of years ago, I found myself in line to get food behind Bill James. I'm not unlike many baseball writers and wanna-be analysts -- James has had and continues to have a profound impact on the way I think about the game. We also happen to have both been raised in the rural Midwest. I was introduced to him once years ago at a SABR event in Kansas City, but it was awkward and fleeting, so I knew he didn't recognize me. I followed him through the food line, which had to take at least 10 minutes. I encountered him again waiting for the elevator, then rode up the elevator with him for a few floors, just the two of us. I may have nodded at him at some point, but no words were exchanged.Los Angeles Angels Face Coverings

David Schoenfield: Instead of a trade, I'm going with two landmark free-agent signings: Dave Winfield's 10-year, $23 million contract with the New York Yankees at the 1980 meetings and Kevin Brown's seven-year, $105 million deal with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1998. Both deals rocked the sport and led to the inevitable cries that baseball was broken. Both were star players, but not necessarily the best in the game, and Brown was 34 years old. Just a year before Winfield's contract, Nolan Ryan had become the sport's first million dollar-a-year man, signing a four-year, $4.5 million contract with the Houston Astros. Yankees owner George Steinbrenner blew that away. Eighteen years later, Brown crossed baseball's version of the 4-minute mile with the first $100 million deal (skipping past $14 million in annual salary to reach $15 million). The deal enraged front offices around the game. "There is no appropriate comment," commissioner Bud Selig said. Brown lasted five seasons with the Dodgers -- and they never made the playoffs.New York Mets Face Coverings

The Phillies, still without a winning season since 2011, have reached the point where the proverbial final pieces -- the expensive veteran stars -- have not only been added but are leaving: catcher J.T. Realmuto is a free agent; starter Jake Arrieta's three-year contract is spent; closer David Robertson's two-year deal -- remember that? -- just expired; and infielder Jean Segura is reportedly coming up in trade talks. The Phillies might still get good, but they're no longer:Minnesota Twins Face Coverings

During these unprecedented times, most of us are following the CDC guidelines for wearing face masks in public to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus. However, for the 64 percent of Americans who wear glasses – and countless others who wear sunglasses – this new public health mandate comes with an unexpected consequence: foggy lenses.Chicago White Sox Face Coverings